Title

The Relationship Between Alcoholism, Cirrhosis, and the Progression of Peptic Ulcer Disease

Date of Award

Spring 2022

Degree Name

Master of Medical Science (Physician Assistant)

Department

Physician Assistant; College of Health Sciences

First Advisor

Dr. Kevin Basile, MD, PT

Abstract

The relationship between alcohol and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is acknowledged, although not entirely understood. For decades, the understanding of this relationship has primarily pertained to alcohol’s ability to serve as an irritant to the gastric mucosa. However, recent research suggests alcohol’s potential for impact on PUD is far greater than surface-level erosion. Rather, it has recently become evident that liver cirrhosis secondary to alcohol use can result in increased risk for peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB), long-term recurrence of peptic ulcers, risk of peptic ulcer rebleeding, bleedingdue to coagulopathies and thrombocytopenia, increased likelihood of infection, and complications in the repair of perforated ulcers.

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The Relationship Between Alcoholism, Cirrhosis, and the Progression of Peptic Ulcer Disease

The relationship between alcohol and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is acknowledged, although not entirely understood. For decades, the understanding of this relationship has primarily pertained to alcohol’s ability to serve as an irritant to the gastric mucosa. However, recent research suggests alcohol’s potential for impact on PUD is far greater than surface-level erosion. Rather, it has recently become evident that liver cirrhosis secondary to alcohol use can result in increased risk for peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB), long-term recurrence of peptic ulcers, risk of peptic ulcer rebleeding, bleedingdue to coagulopathies and thrombocytopenia, increased likelihood of infection, and complications in the repair of perforated ulcers.