Title

The War Against Dry, Itchy Skin: Dupilumab for Eczema

Date of Award

Summer 2022

Degree Name

Master of Medical Science (Physician Assistant)

Department

Physician Assistant; College of Health Sciences

First Advisor

Amanda Murphy

Abstract

More than half of all adults diagnosed with moderate-to-severe eczema suffer from the disease daily, despite initiation of treatment. It is known to be an incurable diagnosis, but the previously prescribed regimen of corticosteroids and moisturizing ointments are proving to be woefully inadequate. Patients report recurrence of flare-ups, despite adherence to topical therapy. The itch-and-scratch cycle is relentless. As the number of uncontrolled eczema cases continues to rise, providers are forced to re-evaluate the efficacy of these traditional topicals and look to other drug classes for relief. This article reviews the risks and benefits of the first FDA-approved injectable biologic for eczema called Dupixent®. So far, the response has been promising: after 4 months from the first injection, nearly 40% report almost clear skin.13 With it comes a notable improvement in quality of life, anxiety, and depression.17,18 This article further analyzes additional statistics and survey results that were gathered from the National Eczema Association, as well as from controlled experimental studies and real patient testimonies posted on the Dupixent® website. Supplementary findings were included to explicate the relationship between the pathophysiology of eczema and the pharmacodynamics of Dupixent®. Based on the evidence presented in this paper, it’s safe to presume patients with moderate-to-severe eczema can be reassured of a more optimistic prognosis.

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The War Against Dry, Itchy Skin: Dupilumab for Eczema

More than half of all adults diagnosed with moderate-to-severe eczema suffer from the disease daily, despite initiation of treatment. It is known to be an incurable diagnosis, but the previously prescribed regimen of corticosteroids and moisturizing ointments are proving to be woefully inadequate. Patients report recurrence of flare-ups, despite adherence to topical therapy. The itch-and-scratch cycle is relentless. As the number of uncontrolled eczema cases continues to rise, providers are forced to re-evaluate the efficacy of these traditional topicals and look to other drug classes for relief. This article reviews the risks and benefits of the first FDA-approved injectable biologic for eczema called Dupixent®. So far, the response has been promising: after 4 months from the first injection, nearly 40% report almost clear skin.13 With it comes a notable improvement in quality of life, anxiety, and depression.17,18 This article further analyzes additional statistics and survey results that were gathered from the National Eczema Association, as well as from controlled experimental studies and real patient testimonies posted on the Dupixent® website. Supplementary findings were included to explicate the relationship between the pathophysiology of eczema and the pharmacodynamics of Dupixent®. Based on the evidence presented in this paper, it’s safe to presume patients with moderate-to-severe eczema can be reassured of a more optimistic prognosis.