Date of Award

Spring 2021

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology; College of Arts & Sciences

First Advisor

Marianne Miserandino

Abstract

How can effective inclusive classroom practices foster positive social and academic learning outcomes in students with high-functioning autism? In many public schools, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often not provided with the same educational opportunities of their neurotypical peers, and are often isolated from them, which has the ability to delay their academic and social development. Unfortunately, in the public school system a majority of students with autism are often grouped together rather than seen as individuals when it comes to developing and carrying out interventions in the classroom. This becomes a problem when targeting specific learning outcomes to an individual. All target skills are not created equal and while one student may need extra assistance in one area it may not be beneficial to the others. Therefore, targeting interventions to the individual student can produce stronger learning outcomes for all. Inclusion in the classroom is designed to promote academic and social skills for students with autism and develop positive learning outcomes. Students with autism can learn from their neurotypically developing peers when they are in the same class by mirroring their behaviors, engaging in conversations, and observing appropriate social skills. Inclusion is a way to provide positive learning outcomes for students with autism by allowing them to develop academic and social skills that can prepare them for higher education and the adult world.

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Effective Inclusive Classroom Practices for Students with High-Functioning Autism that Foster Positive Social and Academic Learning Outcomes

How can effective inclusive classroom practices foster positive social and academic learning outcomes in students with high-functioning autism? In many public schools, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often not provided with the same educational opportunities of their neurotypical peers, and are often isolated from them, which has the ability to delay their academic and social development. Unfortunately, in the public school system a majority of students with autism are often grouped together rather than seen as individuals when it comes to developing and carrying out interventions in the classroom. This becomes a problem when targeting specific learning outcomes to an individual. All target skills are not created equal and while one student may need extra assistance in one area it may not be beneficial to the others. Therefore, targeting interventions to the individual student can produce stronger learning outcomes for all. Inclusion in the classroom is designed to promote academic and social skills for students with autism and develop positive learning outcomes. Students with autism can learn from their neurotypically developing peers when they are in the same class by mirroring their behaviors, engaging in conversations, and observing appropriate social skills. Inclusion is a way to provide positive learning outcomes for students with autism by allowing them to develop academic and social skills that can prepare them for higher education and the adult world.

 
 

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