Date of Award

Spring 2020

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology; College of Arts & Sciences

First Advisor

Adam Levy

Abstract

BEAUTY DAVIS

Depression in Adolescence: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Intervention - An argument for trauma-informed care in the community

Depression is an unfortunately common mental illness that can lead to negative life outcomes such as substance abuse, suicide, lower quality of life, and anxiety. The stage of adolescence is known as a pivotal, transitional time of life as there are many changes in an individual’s physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. The research reviewed throughout this paper discusses risk factors that contribute to the development of depressive symptoms in adolescence. Observing how genetic, physiological, environmental, and social components contribute to cognitive vulnerabilities that may compromise an adolescent’s ability to regulate emotions may give an insight of the importance of implementing treatment practices and other prevention methods. Accessibility of mental health resources has been shown to be a beneficial intervention and preventative measure for depression in adolescents. Trauma-informed care given by non-practitioners, such as teachers, has also been shown to be beneficial in protecting against negative outcomes associated with youth at risk for developing depression. Overall, the concepts of this research analysis support the idea that receiving timely treatment for depressive symptoms in childhood could alleviate subsequently negative life outcomes that were to occur if left untreated or unrecognized.

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Depression in Adolescence: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Intervention - An argument for trauma-informed care in the community

BEAUTY DAVIS

Depression in Adolescence: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Intervention - An argument for trauma-informed care in the community

Depression is an unfortunately common mental illness that can lead to negative life outcomes such as substance abuse, suicide, lower quality of life, and anxiety. The stage of adolescence is known as a pivotal, transitional time of life as there are many changes in an individual’s physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. The research reviewed throughout this paper discusses risk factors that contribute to the development of depressive symptoms in adolescence. Observing how genetic, physiological, environmental, and social components contribute to cognitive vulnerabilities that may compromise an adolescent’s ability to regulate emotions may give an insight of the importance of implementing treatment practices and other prevention methods. Accessibility of mental health resources has been shown to be a beneficial intervention and preventative measure for depression in adolescents. Trauma-informed care given by non-practitioners, such as teachers, has also been shown to be beneficial in protecting against negative outcomes associated with youth at risk for developing depression. Overall, the concepts of this research analysis support the idea that receiving timely treatment for depressive symptoms in childhood could alleviate subsequently negative life outcomes that were to occur if left untreated or unrecognized.

 
 

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